The Relationship between Dorsal Spine Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Pain and the Efficacy of Manipulation on Them

  • Sirous Azizi Assistant Professor, Research Center of Clinical Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3251-6322
  • Zahra Rezasoltani Associate Professor, Research Center of Clinical Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1864-9388
  • Sharif Najafi Assistant Professor, Research Center of Clinical Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9544-4525
  • Kamran Azma Professor, Research Center of Clinical Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9708-7725
  • Sanaz Hamidipanah Resident, Research Center of Clinical Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6333-1868
  • Afsaneh Dadarkhah Instructor, Research Center of Clinical Biomechanics and Ergonomics, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0103-7046
Keywords: Gastrointestinal pain; Spine; Dysfunction; Manipulation therapy

Abstract

Background: The goal of this study was to check the exact relationship between gastrointestinal (GI) pain and dorsal spine dysfunction.

Methods: This was a case-control study. 62 patients without underlying GI problems were divided into two groups. The first group included patients with minor intervertebral dysfunction (MID+) and the second group had no MID. Spinal manipulation was performed for patients with MID and for the MID- group. The rate of recovery of GI symptoms was compared before and after the manipulation between the two groups.

Results: After the first session of manipulation, the decrease in pain intensity in the MID+ group was more than the MID- group (P < 0.001). After the second session, the pain intensity in the MID+ group decreased sharply, while no significant decrease was recorded in the MID- group one and three months after the manipulation. However, after the third manipulation session, the pain increased in the MID+ group; this was also observed one and three months after manipulation (P = 0.048).

Conclusion: The results indicate that treatment with manipulation has a temporary effect; it can improve the quality of life along with pain alleviation for at least three months.

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Published
2020-03-05
Section
Original Article(s)